The team successfully reached the Grimsfall Hut today after 10 long hours of travel!  They started at 8:45 AM and arrived at 6:45 PM.  They traveled 28 km in a series of 6 pushes with 15 minute breaks in between each push.  Though a long day, they were on a mission to reach the hut.  Everyone is obviously very pumped and excited that they reached their goal!  (Click on today's blog title to see the full dispatch including audio update)

The team just called in from location N 64° 21.364, W 17° 46.763.
 
They reported that after a strong and wet storm last night, they started very early with an "Alpine start" at 3:30 AM. The plan was to spend the time while the glacier was still hard and compact to find a way across a glacier runoff river. After 5 hours of travel and only 4 km of distance, they were able to cross the running water without getting boots wet. They hit the glacier proper at 10:00 AM and spent the rest of the day covering 17 km. This was when the weather finally broke and they enjoyed a bright, sunny, and calm walk up the glacier. They are now in camp looking forward to a good night's rest with everyone feeling good.  They just finished with appetizers. They might try and reach the hut tomorrow.
 
On the Vatnajokul Glacier ready to ski
 
 
Transcript of audio update for those following on mobile devices:

Hello, this is Annie calling from the Vatnajokull Expedition, calling on behalf of Rob and Eric and Eric Lillstrom and John Gluckman. We're having a good time up on the glacier. We are 17 kilometers onto the glacier. We had a long day today. Got up very early to try to take advantage of the cooler temperatures for a river crossing and it worked and but it took us the first 5 hours of the day just to get to the edge of the glacier, and then we were able to put in about 17 kilometers on to the glacier. It started off with some light mist and sometimes heavy mist, almost rain and some stronger winds, but now, and for the last few hours, it has been calm and sunny.  Every so often a few clouds roll and then sunny again, so we're really blessed by this good weather.  We had a big wind storm last night and our tents were fluttering around and so it makes us appreciate this nice calm weather even more. We're all doing good.  We hope you're enjoying following along, and we will report back in tomorrow. Thanks!  Bye-bye.

Want to join our 2018 Vatnajökull Expedition? Read more about it here.

The team was picked up at their hotel in Reykjavik at 5 AM today to drive to the glacier.  They traveled for about 6 hours to Jokulheimar where they ran into a river that they weren't able to cross due to high water levels.  They found a protected spot to camp about 1.5-2 km from the edge of the glacier.  They were glad to find a protected area as the forecast is for gale force winds tonight.  (Click on today's blog title to see the full dispatch including audio update)

The expedition begins!  The team met in Reykjavik and spent the day reviewing their kit, practicing making camp, discussing their daily itinerary and getting to know one another.   When they phoned in, they were getting ready to head out for dinner and their official welcome festivities.  They are excited to be heading out early in the morning for Jokulheimar on the western edge of Vatnajökull.

Stay tuned for updates from the trail.

Want to join our 2018 Vatnajökull Expedition? Read more about it here.

Our guide team of Annie and Eric are off to Iceland to prepare for our crossing of the Vatnajökull Icecap.

The team will be on the trail for nine days, giving regular updates along the way. Follow along for stories and pictures from the land of fire and ice!

Camping on Vatnajokull

Want to join our 2018 Vatnajökull Expedition? Read more about it here.

Our guides are busy cleaning, sorting and organizing gear for next year.  And there is a LOT of gear!  Not to mention catching up on sleep as especially the last few days of their expedition were anything but restful!

The highlight of the day was participating in the March for Science in Longyearbyen.  They joined with the Norwegian Polar Institute, UNIS (the University Centre of Svalbard), local residents of Longyearbyen and others to march down the main street of Longyearbyen and through the pedestrian mall to a gathering where they listened to presentations on the importance of science in our lives and policy.  It was dramatic to take part in this event in an area that has been so dramatically altered by climate change.  The landscape and polar pack ice are changing significantly and it is important for science to tell us why.  Our teams experienced significant changes this year.  One example was having to use ice screws to set up their camps each night whereas in the past they were able to use ice stakes and skis.  There was not enough snow pack this year which is an indication that they were on much younger ice.  There is less and less multi-year ice so it is more susceptible to disappear each summer.  Tom Skilling, THE weather guru in Chicago, has called the Arctic our "canary in the coal mine".


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Phone 1.847.256.4409
Toll-Free USA/CAN. 800.732.7328


Email Us
Phone 1.847.256.4409
Toll-Free USA/CAN. 800.732.7328

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