The light in Antarctica can be amazing. In addition to the brilliant sun that beams down on clear days, one can often see halos (rainbow like rings around the sun), double halos, sun dogs and all sorts of mind bending optics. Today the light looked apocalyptic, with the wind creating a ground blizzard, contrasted by the sun occasionally breaking through the maelstrom.

That is, it looked apocalyptic if you remembered to look up from the tips of your skis, which is where the eyes naturally tend to settle in the rythmic motion of skiing. If you can remember to look up, you are frequently rewarded with powerful moments and images that will be forever etched into your heart and mind.

As the team slept last night the wind rattled their tents, and picked up to a gnarly 22 knots. By morning snow drifts covered their sleds and portions of their tents. A good dig-out is one way to warm up the muscles in the morning, and that's exactly what they had to do. Luckily the wind settled throughout the day and hopefully tomorrow will be easier and more pleasant.

They are now settled in for the night roughly 5 nautical miles from the Pole. If they wake to clear skies it's likely that the South Pole station will be in sight (which is always SUPER exciting).

Everyone is doing well and looking forward to tomorrow!

Listen to today's audio dispatch from Dean and check back again tomorrow for what will hopefully be their dispatch from the Pole!

SP Full 09 BD

If you are enjoying this blog check out our South Pole Last Degree Expedition page and our Mount Vinson page for more information about the expedition.

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Phone 1.847.256.4409
Toll-Free USA/CAN. 800.732.7328