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Saturday, 12 January 2019 21:49

The South Pole!

We are very proud to share that our South Pole Last Degree team reached the Geographic South Pole today at 4:30 PM local time today. This is a huge moment for all of our team members and we can't be more happy for them. For Jim Holliday it marks the completion of his Explorers Grand Slam (climbing the seven summits and skiing to both poles), an endeavor he started in 2005. Congratulations to all of our team - Jim, John, Steve, Jim and Keith for this remarkable achievement. Well done!

You might wonder what exactly is "local" time when you are standing a spot where all the time zones on the planet converge. The short answer is that it can be anytime you want! The longer answer is that people and organizations (such as the National Science Foundation or our Last Degree Ski team) choose the time zone that makes the most sense for them. The South Pole station runs on New Zealand time because all people flying to the Pole with the National Science Foundation are coming through New Zealand. Our team is on Chilean time, because they originally came from Chile. The 24 hour sun means that anytime can be morning, or night, or happy hour!

Here's a review of our team's day. They woke up to relatively clear skies and milder temperatures (around -15F), but still had a persistent wind. This wind kicked up the ground snow into a bit of a "ground blizzard" meaning that while there was blue sky overhead the visibility of the horizon was limited. It wasn't until they were 5 nautical miles from the Pole that they got their first glimpse of the station. The the wind died a little allowing for better view during their final approach. All in they skied 11 nautical miles today - which is their longest day yet - and a full day of skiing by any standards! As if to make the last day extra special they were rewarded with a double sun dog to their left for much of the day (see below if you don't know what this is). 

The plan is to be at the Pole for two nights before flying back to Union Glacier basecamp on the 14th, and making a quick transfer of planes to get back to Punta Arenas same day. Jim Lumberg will be staying in Antarctica to climb Mt. Vinson, Antarctica's highest mountain, and we will continue to post updates from the expedition here. In the meantime there will be more stories to share, including their time at the South Pole. 

A couple audio dispatches came through but they we cut off. As soon as we receive another dispatch we will post it. Additional photos to follow in tomorrow's post.

Below: A sun dog is a type of halo around the sun, caused by refraction of ice crystals. If often makes it look like there are three or four suns. This pic was taken at the South Pole, but not by our team. Hopefully they got some good shots of the double sun dog they saw today. (Image thanks to NOAA, Lieutenant (j.g.) Cindy McFee, NOAA Corps)